Category Archives: Clothing

Warm war jumpers

JB from Auckland has written in regarding a recent Oily Rag article about the war effort, with her own tip. “My mother during the war would unpick warn jumpers, wash the yarn, and re-knit a new garment. My favourite cardigan was made of contrasting green and pink squares, with pearl buttons.”

John, Whangarei

I have discovered another virtue in having a son-in-law – especially one that is about my size! I now receive an endless supply of pre-loved clothing. My wardrobe is literally bursting with the almost-latest fashion jeans, jackets, and shirts. I am now, very subtly, suggesting what he may like to buy, knowing that it will […]

Cheap threads and other frugal tips

This week we have had lots of interesting letters from the frugal community. John from Whangarei writes, “I have discovered another virtue in having a son-in-law – especially one that is about my size! I now receive an endless supply of pre-loved clothing. My wardrobe is literally bursting with the almost-latest fashion jeans, jackets, and […]

Lorraine, Hamilton.

Duvet cover. I once had a polyester/cotton duvet cover which got faded on the top but the lining was in excellent condition and was excellent quality too so I made a pair of freebee long pyjama bottoms of the underside. The pyjama cord was made from a sheet off-cut. Seven yeas later they’re still going […]

W.G., Waimauku.

I am not a knitter, so op-shop or passed on jumpers etc would be used like knitted material and cut down to make anything from kids clothes, to patchwork throw rugs or to line oven cloths and pot holders. If you are smart and utilise the ribbed areas well shrunk woollens make brilliant leak proof […]

Reader

Gran’ would go to a second hand clothes shop and buy two or three knitted garments. She would undo them, wash the wool and rewind into balls, then knit into multi-coloured jerseys. And with the left over wool she would make soft toys. This is far cheaper than buying new wool.

Y.L

I’ve just finished fixing” a pure wool jumper bought in a jumble sale for $1. It had a very dirty neckline (probably because it had bene knitted too tightly) so I undid several rows and reknitted it on larger needles, discarding the last few inches of wool. Result, a $150 pullover for $1.

S.K.

My savvy sister has saved me heaps on buying baby bibs. As the proud single mum of a beautiful nine month old, I was finding the costs were really adding up! So my sister (who has three children of her own) came to the rescue. She used some old towels, cut them up and made […]

JB, Whangarei.

We have a clothes rack on a pulley above the wood stove so we are heating our house, drying clothes, cooking food and heating hot water all at once. We grow our own firewood also so the only cost here is the petrol for the chain saw, since there’s not enough hours in the day […]